firstdraft Thank You & Farewell to the 2013-14 Firstdraft Directorate

Thank You & Farewell to the 2013-14 Firstdraft Directorate

Posted on: February 16th, 2015 by firstdraftadmin No Comments
  • Thank You & Farewell to the 2013-14 Firstdraft Directorate

    The 2014-15 Firstdraft Directorate would like to acknowledge the hard work, dedication and passion of the outgoing Directorate of 2013-14 – Wilna Fourie, Andrew Moran, Vaughan O’Connor and JD Reforma.

    It is fitting that we thank and farewell this exceptional group with our first News post of our new website, given the firsts that our shared year (2014) saw. 2013-2014 will be remembered as a period of dramatic change for Firstdraft. We were able to offer rent-free shows to artists for the first time, thanks to the tireless efforts of our Grants Committee, Vaughan O’Connor and Wilna Fourie from the 2013-14 Board.

    We moved from our Chalmers St home of 19 years to build a new gallery space in the Firstdraft Depot on Riley St. The new galleries boast four distinct spaces, two studio spaces, a new office facility and a large outdoor courtyard. The relocation and renovation was a huge undertaking, with directors playing a hands-on (and at times very dirty!) role in the creation of our new space. Although this was a group effort, particular acknowledgement must be given to Andrew and Vaughan for their knowledge, perseverance and patience with those of us lesser handy-men and women. Both were incredibly generous with their time and knowledge, and together were responsible for much of the design and execution of the space you see today.

    2014 also saw the conception, design and content generation for this website. We hoped to deliver a website that was image-led, easy-to-navigate and a point of access for artists, curators, writers and audiences across Australia and internationally. In seeing this vision come to fruition, we must acknowledge the inimitable JD, who went above and beyond the call of duty. His sharp eye, strong aesthetic sense and unwavering commitment were the (sometimes sole) driving force behind the product you are using right now! In his role as Media Liaison, JD also worked tirelessly to build Firstdraft’s profile and strengthen our communications, creating a strong and successful following across a number of platforms.

    Our new space also saw a re-commitment to dynamic critical thinking and one-off events. In driving the regeneration of the Firstdraft Writers Program, launched at last year’s Writers Forum, Wilna was pivotal. Her passion for text, critical discussion and forums to bring these things to life has ensured a strong legacy of these public programs at the gallery. Wilna was also responsible for building our volunteer program into a thriving and sustainable community, with numbers and retention at an all-time high at the time of her departure.

    2014 was successful in many ways. Our fundraising auction was the best to date, largely thanks to the efforts of directors in reaching out to artists, promoting to wide networks and hanging a beautiful show. 2014 was led by the tireless Andrew, supported by the whole team. Our program was strengthened by an increased volume of applications and the improved facilities. The new spaces afford us increased opportunity to program sound work and other mediums. The outgoing board played a major role in shaping and supporting this diverse and exciting program, setting a high benchmark for us going forward.

    Wilna, Andrew, Vaughan and JD together ushered in this new era for Firstdraft, which looks both back on our almost 30 year history and forward to a long and bright future. We could not have hoped for a better group to guide us in our first year. We’ll miss your passion, humour, energy, and most of all your dancing.

    Firstdraft’s back, alright!

michaela davies 04.03.2015 – 27.03.2015

YAWNING ROOM

Yawning Room is a participatory audio/video installation aiming to induce involuntary yawning responses in the viewer upon exposure to the work, thus contributing, in real time, to the environment created by the multiple yawners in the installation.

The work comprises three channel video, projecting six subjects at a time, accompanied by a six channel audio track. The 23 subjects in Yawning Room were filmed as they watched videos of people yawning, and, in turn, provide yawning stimuli for the viewer. The accompanying six channel composition was created from dry and processed recordings of yawns.

Yawning Room is a continuation of Davies’ interest in using involuntary mechanisms of the body as a tool for composition, and participatory art as performative research. An experiment in the induction of involuntary audience participation, the viewer creates an additional layer to the installation.

While the causes of contagious yawning are still unknown, the relationship between yawn contagion and empathy is strongly supported. The hypothesised behavioural response in the viewer is an embodied realization of connectedness- a shared moment of art viewing lassitude.

biography

Michaela is a cross-disciplinary artist whose practice is informed by an interest in the role of psychological and physical agency in creative processes and performance. Her recent work has used electric muscle stimulation to both obstruct and extend human capabilities through the elicitation of involuntary movement in performers.

 

anna pogossova 04.03.2015 – 27.03.2015

XV

XV features a new body of photomedia work, by Anna Pogossova, which charts the logic of imaginary environments, across science fiction, computer gaming, and Renaissance art, via digital composites of real-life studio sets and computer-generated imagery.

Anna’s practice is concerned with the experience of familiarity in fictional imagery. It explores the way cultural references can validate belief, trigger interpretations, and habituated ways of seeing.

The exhibition observes this phenomenon throughout the invention and reading of images, and universally shared narratives of the otherworldly and unreal.

biography

Anna Pogossova is a Moscow born, Sydney based photomedia artist, who primarily works with still life. Since graduating from College of Fine Arts with a BFA (Hons) Degree in 2007, she has exhibited as part of Hazelhurst Art on Paper Award in 2011, was the recipient of the Illford Photography Prize in 2005, as well as the Lucy Aspinall Photography Prize in 2007, and a finalist in the Head On Portrait Prize of the same year.

Instagram #fdannapogossova

curated by consuelo cavaniglia 03.03.2015 – 27.03.2015

chromatic syncopation

With:

Rebecca Baumann, Ross Manning and Reko Rennie

Whirring of fans, rotation of mechanised signs, repetition of patterns – the work of Rebecca Baumann, Ross Manning and Reko Rennie shares an attitude towards mechanisation and the processes of reproduction. Their works prioritise colour and make distinctive use of it in considerations on the state of contemporary life. This exhibition brings together their works for the first time to explore points of connection and departure in a series of installation and wall-based works.

biographies

REKO RENNIE (VIC)

Reko Rennie is an interdisciplinary artist who explores his Aboriginal identity through contemporary mediums. Rennie’s art incorporates his association to the Kamilaroi people, using traditional geometric patterning that represents his community. Through his art, Rennie provokes discussion surrounding Indigenous culture and identity in contemporary urban environments.

REBECCA BAUMANN (WA)

Rebecca Baumann is an interdisciplinary artist working predominantly in kinetic sculpture and installation. Through a formal and conceptual exploration of materials, Baumann’s recent works have critically interrogated ideas of colour, happiness, and emotion. Often kinetic and ephemeral in nature, her works seek to affect the audience through their experiential, momentary and emotive qualities.

ROSS MANNING (QLD)

Ross Manning is an interdisciplinary artist working with installation, technology, kinetics and sound. Ross creates phenomenological works using old and new technology combined with common, ubiquitous objects from everyday life. Reinterpreted and disconnected from the objects’ intended use, these works operate in a semi-autonomous state of logic that investigates the materials themselves with an experimental agenda.

CONSUELO CAVANIGLIA (NSW)

Working across mediums Consuelo Cavaniglia develops installation and wall-based works that focus on how we look at and understand the spaces we inhabit. Her practice is flanked by independent curatorial projects often developed outside of traditional exhibition venues.

This exhibition has been supported through the Firstdraft Emerging Curators Program.

Instagram #fdchromaticsyncopation

siân mcintyre 04.02.2015 – 27.02.2015

circular settlements

Circular Settlements represents the output of a three year research project spanning across Australia and Scotland.

An installation incorporating sound, turf, video and print, Circular Settlements reflects on dislocation and loss. In each medium a range of actions typically associated with the claiming of cultures or sites is repeated. These actions are attempts to access a connection to place by referencing colonial land clearing, cultural appropriation and performance. The result is a collection of surreal and at times humorous attempts to claim place and culture, creating an awkward space of displacement and vulnerability.

(Title Circular Settlements is borrowed from Isobel Parker Phillip’s review of Exile’s Lament for The Art Life)

 

biography

Siân McIntyre is a Sydney based artist and curator and a current Masters candidate and APA recipient at UNSW Art and Design. In 2013 she undertook a practicum exchange placement at Glasgow School of Arts and completed a residency in Olofström Sweden. Siân has exhibited in Sydney, New York, Glasgow, San Francisco, Sweden and is currently working on a creative project in Darwin. Her practice is influenced by intermittent work at Papunya Tjupi Arts, NT as a casual art consultant over the past 7 years. Siân was one of four founding Directors of The Paper Mill and is currently the curator/manager at Verge Gallery Sydney.

alex pye 04.02.2015 – 27.02.2015

cumnock: the musical!

Times are tough in Cumnock.

Unemployment is high, the cafe’s closed up, you can’t drink the tap water, there was no rugby team this year and the population is in flux. From December onwards the heat causes the oldies to drop like flies, and the youngsters either try and find some farm work or leave for the mines. It’s quiet enough out here so you either make your own fun or bloody die of boredom.

For this exhibition I am using sculpture, found object and video to reflect the social issues that I have experienced from living in a rural backwater for three years.

 

biography

Alex lives alone in a farming village in regional NSW where she bases her studio practice from the shed in her backyard. Since relocating to the bush she has enjoyed drinking rum and coke and shooting her father’s guns. Basing her work in performance, video, sculpture and found objects, she is a current MFA candidate at Sydney College of the arts and is a self described ‘Sick cunt’.

laura moore 04.02.2015 – 27.02.2015

framed

‘Framed’ examines the nature of photography itself, experimenting with the capacity of the photographic portrait to represent complex meanings about identity.

I built glass cubicles in varying sizes then asked artists to become subjects themselves. Presenting the glass cubicle as the physical incarnation of the final image, I asked the subjects to pose nude inside the cubicle. The constructed space of the glass cubicles represented what the final image would be while exposing the normally hidden exploitative element in the relationship between artist and subject. The final image is the life-size print of that constructed space, holding and confining the exposed subject. Through printing the portraits life-size, the viewer is confronted with a life-size body easily relatable and comparable to their own. Exaggerating the constructed and exploitative capacity of the photographic portrait, this work asks us to recognise the voyeuristic desires and scrutinizing gaze that the photographic portrait invites.

 

biography

Laura Moore is an emerging artist based is Sydney. A recent graduate of Sydney College of the Arts, her work examines the nature of photography itself, experimenting with the capacity of the photographic portrait to represent complex meanings about identity and human relationships. Often inspired and informed by her everyday life, observations and memory, Moore’s work actively inviting speculation and projection.

christopher handran artist talks 26.02.2015

aqueous humour

The exhibition Aqueous Humour engages with the experiential logics of immersion, sensation and spectacle, to create a playfully contemplative space.

The works in the exhibition continue an exploration of the mediation of lived experience, and the losses and gains that are incurred in this process of translation.

The exhibition features video works centred around ideas of immersion, submersion and quotidian experience, presented via viewing devices constructed using everyday materials and a diy methodology. These devices relate to both contemporary and historical technologies of vision, including 3D cinema, virtual reality, scientific devices and ‘philosophical toys’ such as the kaleidoscope, the zoetrope and anamorphic mirrors. The works both subvert and are informed by the intertwined histories of art, cinema, and the sciences of illusion and perception.

These technologies are foregrounded in the work, both as objects and as mediators and generators of experience. This involves constructing devices and modifications that literally intervene in the workings of these media, dividing the spectator’s attention between the object and its operations.  By foregrounding the mediating apparatus in the spectator’s experience, the works seek to create a spectacle that playfully subverts its own spectacular nature.

 

biography

Christopher Handran has exhibited widely nationally and internationally, including recent exhibitions at Blindside (Melbourne), Feltspace (Adelaide), SkulpturenMuseum Glaskasten Marl (Germany) and The Block (Brisbane). In 2007 he was awarded the Australia Council London Studio, and in 2015 will undertake a residency at the Institute of Cultural Inquiry, Los Angeles.

 

Image credit: Zan Wimberley

Instagram #fdaqueoushumour

How Can I Use Gastric Band Hypnotherapy To Improve My Life?

Gastric Band Hypnotherapy is a useful skill that anyone can learn. You do not need to be a certified hypnotist to perform this skill. Anyone can use the skills to improve their lives.

The most common use of hypnosis is physical therapy. Most people go to a doctor to get a treatment, but these professionals can sometimes be unhelpful. If you want to become a better doctor, then you should consider learning hypnosis.

There are many people who suffer from overeating and have a fear of weight loss. These people often have their fear reduced through hypnosis. This type of therapy can also work for those who are afraid of other people’s expectations. Hypnosis can help someone to relax and become more confident.

Your family and friends can also benefit from this skill. They will find that they can improve their lives through hypnotism. It can help you solve family problems, especially where the main problem lies in a lack of communication. You will be able to help your family member be more assertive.

Another use of hypnotism is that it can help you change your own life. Many people can help you improve your health. Hypnotism can help you get rid of your addiction to smoking.

You may have friends and family who are overweight, but you want to help them get back into shape. Hypnotism can help them lose weight or gain it if they are currently underweight. When they know how to use hypnotism, they will become healthier and live longer.

If you feel that you need help with an addiction to alcohol, you can use band hypnotherapy. Alcohol addiction is difficult to overcome because of the effect it has on the brain. Hypnotism can help you overcome this problem.

This is an effective tool for you to use to reduce your stress. Stress is known to cause anxiety, which is known to cause health problems. However, hypnosis can help you to reduce this stress, and this can make you more healthy.

Hypnosis can help you avoid unhealthy behaviors like smoking. This habit can be very difficult to overcome, but with hypnotism, you can change this habit. You will be healthier and less stressed.

Hypnotism can help you control your anger and stop your alcohol addiction. You will be able to see how much you can change with hypnosis. You will be able to help yourself and others.

When a person hypnotizes, they often focus on the emotion, rather than the words. This can help people to control the body. With this skill, you can increase your physical and mental abilities.

One of the best things about this skill is that it does not require you to work on it all at once. It works gradually. This is good for anyone who wants to start to improve their lives. It can improve your ability to self-care, as well as your relationships.

House Painters Auckland: Working With You to Bring About Great Results

House painters Auckland has come from all over the country and they’re able to offer you an even greater variety of services and skills. The best thing is that they’re trained to paint anything from a simple plaster wall to a grand five-storey building, whatever the client wants and whatever their budget.

They have vast knowledge and experience and are able to handle a range of different surfaces. Their tools are modern and made to last. They can make any area look brand new and give your home a fresh and stylish new look.

Most people with large works will hire a house painter Auckland to do the work, especially if it’s not something that’s cheap. They’re highly trained and experienced, and use all of the best tools to give you top quality results at a price you can afford. You could try to do the work yourself, but with such a huge scale of jobs it would be very difficult to get the same quality and finish as they do.

Home owners with large commercial or residential works may be attracted to hiring professional painters to work on a larger scale. These larger businesses hire painters regularly, particularly if they’re looking to renovate, or if they have large, industrial or commercial buildings that need restoration. They are able to do any kind of work for any kind of client, in any kind of condition, using all of the latest tools.

Painting can be a very messy job, so you need to make sure that you hire the best that you can find. If you’ve got a big painting job then you might need a larger crew to get the job done. You also need to consider how many people you have in your household and make sure that they can handle a large amount of people being involved in the project.

You don’t need a team of painters to do the work – there are plenty of experts out there who can do it for you. You can talk to your mates who have had work done recently and get some advice from them. The key is to get a list of a few reputable house painters that are suitable for the type of work you want done, and go from there.

Most house painters won’t just paint walls, so you’ll have to do some research into what services they can offer you. This will help you narrow down the field and prepare yourself for an appointment. Look for ways to cut down on the cost, for example by splitting a large job into several smaller ones, or spending more on a larger budget, because this can reduce the overall cost.

If you’re a homeowner or business owner who needs a lot of repairs or restoration done, then hire house painters Auckland for your needs. You’ll get a quick and professional service that will get your house looking its best and giving your home a brand new look.